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MOAL03 Beam Commissioning of SuperKEKB Rings at Phase 1 feedback, detector, injection, damping 6
 
  • M. Tobiyama, M. Arinaga, J.W. Flanagan, H. Fukuma, H. Ikeda, H. Ishii, K. Mori, E. Mulyani, M. Tejima
    KEK, Ibaraki, Japan
  • G. Bonvicini
    Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA
  • E. Mulyani
    Sokendai, Ibaraki, Japan
  • G.S. Varner
    University of Hawaii, Honolulu,, USA
 
  The Phase 1 commissioning of SuperKEKB rings with-out superconducting final focus magnets or Belle-II de-tector began in Feb., 2016. A total of 1010 mA (LER) and 870 mA (HER) stored beam has been achieved close to the design emittance and x-y coupling. Most of the beam diagnostics, including new systems such as gated turn-by-turn monitors and X-ray beam size monitors, have been commissioned with beam and proved to be essential to the success of machine commissioning. The results of the beam commissioning, including the evaluation and diffi-culties of the beam diagnostics are shown.  
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DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-MOAL03  
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MOBL02 First Experience with the Standard Diagnostics at the European XFEL Injector diagnostics, gun, electron, electronics 14
 
  • D. Lipka, A. Affeldt, A. Awwad, N. Baboi, B. Barret, B. Beutner, F. Brinker, W. Decking, A. Delfs, M. Drewitsch, O. Frank, C. Gerth, V. Gharibyan, O. Hensler, M. Hoeptner, M. Holz, K.K. Knaack, F. Krivan, I. Krouptchenkov, J. Kruse, G. Kube, B. Lemcke, T. Lensch, J. Liebing, T. Limberg, B. Lorbeer, J. Lund-Nielsen, S.M. Meykopff, B. Michalek, J. Neugebauer, Re. Neumann, Ru. Neumann, D. Nölle, M. Pelzer, G. Petrosyan, Z. Pisarov, P. Pototzki, G. Priebe, K.R. Rehlich, D. Renner, V. Rybnikov, G. Schlesselmann, F. Schmidt-Föhre, M. Scholz, L. Shi, P.A. Smirnov, H. Sokolinski, C. Stechmann, M. Steckel, R. Susen, H. Tiessen, S. Vilcins, T. Wamsat, N. Wentowski, M. Werner, Ch. Wiebers, J. Wilgen, K. Wittenburg, R. Zahn, A. Ziegler
    DESY, Hamburg, Germany
  • R. Baldinger, R. Ditter, B. Keil, W. Koprek, R. Kramert, G. Marinkovic, M. Roggli, M. Stadler, D.M. Treyer
    PSI, Villigen PSI, Switzerland
  • A. Ignatenko
    DESY Zeuthen, Zeuthen, Germany
  • A. Kaukher
    XFEL. EU, Hamburg, Germany
  • O. Napoly, C. Simon
    CEA/DSM/IRFU, France
 
  The injector of the European XFEL is in operation since December 2015. It includes, beside the gun and the accelerating section, containing 1.3 and a 3.9 GHz accelerating module, a variety of standard diagnostics systems specially designed for this facility. With very few exceptions, all types of diagnostics systems are installed in the injector. Therefore the operation of the injector is served to validate and prove the diagnostics characteristics for the complete European XFEL. Most of the standard diagnostics has been available for the start of beam operation and showed the evidence of first beam along the beam line. In the following months the diagnostics has been optimized and used for improvements of beam quality. First operational experiences and results from the standard beam diagnostics in the injector of the European XFEL will be reported in this contribution.  
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DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-MOBL02  
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MOBL04 LHC Online Chromaticity Measurement - Experience After One Year of Operation injection, controls, feedback, hardware 20
 
  • K. Fuchsberger, G.H. Hemelsoet
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  Hardware and infrastructural requirements to measure chromaticity in the LHC were available since the beginning. However, the calculation of the chromaticity was mostly made offline. This gap was closed in 2015 by the development of a dedicated application for the LHC control room, which takes the measured data and produces estimates for the chromaticity values immediately online and allows to correct chroma and tune accordingly. This tool proved to be essential during commissioning as well as during every injection-phase of the LHC. It became particularly important during the intensity ramp-up with 25ns where good control of the chromaticity became crucial at injection. This paper describes the concepts and algorithms behind this tool, the experience gained as well as further plans for improvements.  
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DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-MOBL04  
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MOPG03 Investigation of Transverse Beam Instability Induced by an In-vacuum Undulator at SPEAR3 simulation, coupling, vacuum, insertion-device 31
 
  • K. Tian, J.J. Sebek, J.L. Vargas
    SLAC, Menlo Park, California, USA
 
  Funding: Work supported by U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC02-76SF00515
Vertical beam instabilities have been observed at SPEAR3 when a newly installed in-vacuum undulator (IVUN) is operated at a set of narrow gap settings. The source of the instabilities is believed to be vertically deflecting trapped modes inside the IVUN tank that are excited by the beam. We have used beam-based measurements to characterize the frequencies and strengths of the excited modes using both our bunch-by-bunch feedback system and a spectrum analyzer. Using numerical simulations of our IVUN structure, we have found modes with high shunt impedance near the measured frequencies. Recently, we have successfully measured these IVUN modes during our current downtime. In this paper, we will report on the measurements, simulations, and plans to damp these modes.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-MOPG03  
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MOPG13 MicroTCA.4 Based Optical Frontend Readout Electronics and its Applications feedback, laser, electronics, electron 67
 
  • K.P. Przygoda, L. Butkowski, M.K. Czwalinna, H. Dinter, C. Gerth, E. Janas, F. Ludwig, S. Pfeiffer, H. Schlarb, Ch. Schmidt, M. Viti
    DESY, Hamburg, Germany
  • R. Rybaniec
    Warsaw University of Technology, Institute of Electronic Systems, Warsaw, Poland
 
  In the paper the MicroTCA.4 based optical frontend readout (OFR) electronics and its applications for beam arrival time monitor (BAM) and fast beam based feed-back (BBF) is presented. The idea is to have a possibility to monitor the modulation density of the optical laser pulses by the electron bunches and apply this information for the BBF. The OFR composed of double width fast mezzanine card (FMC) and advanced mezzanine card (AMC) based FMC carrier. The FMC module consists of three optical channel inputs (data and clock), two optical channel outputs (beam arrival time), 250 MSPS ADCs, clock generator module (CGM) with integrated 2.8 GHz voltage control oscillator (VCO). The optical signals are detected with 800 MHz InGaAs photodiodes, conditioned using 2 GHz current-feedback amplifiers, filtered by 3.3 GHz differential amplifiers and next direct sampled with 16-bit 900 MHz of analog bandwidth ADCs. The CGM is used to provide clock outputs for the ADCs and for the FMC carrier with additive output jitter of less than 300 fs rms. The BAM application has been implemented using Virtex 5 FPGA and measured with its performance at Free Electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH) facility.  
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DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-MOPG13  
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MOPG17 Performance Test of the Next Generation X-Ray Beam Position Monitor System for the APS Upgrade undulator, photon, storage-ring, controls 78
 
  • B.X. Yang, Y. Jaski, S.H. Lee, F. Lenkszus, M. Ramanathan, N. Sereno, F. Westferro
    ANL, Argonne, Illinois, USA
 
  Funding: Work supported by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.
The Advanced Photon Source is developing its next major upgrade (APS-U) based on the multi-bend achromat lattice. Improved beam stability is critical for this upgrade and will require keeping short-time beam angle change below 0.25 μrad and long-term angle drift below 0.5 micro-radian. A reliable white x-ray beam diagnostic system in the front end is a key part of the planned beam stabilization system for the APS-U. This system includes an x-ray beam position monitor (XBPM) based on x-ray fluorescence (XRF) from two specially designed GlidCop A-15 absorbers, a second XBPM using XRF photons from the Exit Mask, and two white beam intensity monitors using XRF from the photon shutter and Compton-scattered photons from the front end beryllium window. We present orbit stability data for the first XBPM used in the feedback control during user operations, as well as test data from the second XBPM and the intensity monitors. The data demonstrated that the XBPM system meets the APS-U beam stability requirements.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-MOPG17  
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MOPG21 Development of a Method for Continuous Functional Supervision of BLM Systems detector, monitoring, high-voltage, electronics 90
 
  • C.F. Hajdu, C. Zamantzas
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • T. Dabóczi, C.F. Hajdu
    BUTE, Budapest, Hungary
 
  It is of vital importance to provide a continuous and comprehensive overview of the functionality of beam loss monitoring (BLM) systems, with particular emphasis on the connectivity and correct operation of the detectors. At CERN, a new BLM system for the pre-accelerators of the LHC is currently at an advanced stage of development. This contribution reports on a new method which aims to automatically and continuously ensure the proper connection and performance of the detectors used in the new BLM system.  
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MOPG22 Studies and Historical Analysis of ALBA Beam Loss Monitors vacuum, storage-ring, injection, detector 94
 
  • A.A. Nosych, U. Iriso
    ALBA-CELLS Synchrotron, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain
 
  During 5 years of operation in the 3 GeV storage ring of ALBA, the 124 beam loss monitors (BLM) have provided stable measurements of relative losses around the machine, with around 10% breakdown of units. We have analyzed these BLM failures and correlated the integrated received dose with any special conditions of each BLM location which might have led to their breakdown. We also show studies of beam losses in the insertion devices, with particular attention to the results in the multipole wiggler (MPW), where the vacuum chamber is (suspected to be) misaligned and high BLM counts are detected.  
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MOPG27 The Design, Construction and Operation of the Beam Instrumentation for the High Intensity and Energy Upgrade of ISOLDE at CERN diagnostics, detector, target, cryomodule 101
 
  • W. Andreazza, E. Bravin, E.D. Cantero, S. Sadovich, A.G. Sosa, R. Veness
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • J.M. Carmona, J.H. Galipienzo, P.N.G. Noguera Crespo
    AVS, Elgoibar, Spain
 
  The High Intensity and Energy (HIE) upgrade to the on-line isotope separation facility (ISOLDE) facility at CERN is currently in the process of being commissioned. The very tight space available between the superconducting acceleration cavities and a challenging specification led to the design of a compact 'diagnostic box' with a number of insertable instruments on a common vacuum chamber. The box was conceived in partnership with the engineering firm AVS and produced as a completed assembly in industry. 14 diagnostic boxes have been installed and are now operational. This paper will describe the design, the construction and first results from operation of these HIE ISOLDE diagnostic boxes.  
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MOPG29 Beam Diagnostics Design for a Compact Superconducting Cyclotron for Radioisotope Production cyclotron, diagnostics, ion, ion-source 108
 
  • R. Varela, P. Abramian, J. Calero, P. Calvo, M.A. Domínguez, E.F. Estévez, L. García-Tabarés, D. Gavela, P. Gómez, A. Guirao, J.L. Gutiérrez, J.I. Lagares, D. López, L.M. Martínez, D. Obradors-Campos, C. Oliver, J.M. Pérez Morales, I. Podadera, F. Toral, C. Vázquez
    CIEMAT, Madrid, Spain
 
  Funding: Work supported by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, project FIS2013-40860-R.
The aim of the AMIT cyclotron is to deliver an 8.5 MeV, 10 μA CW proton beam to a target to produce radioisotopes for PET diagnostics. Such a small cyclotron poses some challenges to the diagnostics design due to its small size. Two sets of diagnostics have been designed, each one aiming at a different phase of the machine lifecycle. During normal operation the stripping foil and the target will be used to measure the current, a dual transverse profile monitor based on a scintillating screen and a Fluorescence Profile Monitor will measure the beam position and the transverse profile. During first stages of commissioning the dual transverse profile monitor and the target will be substituted by an emittance monitor based on a pepperpot. A movable interceptive Beam Probe will be located inside the cyclotron to give information about the beam during acceleration. Additionally, a test bench for the characterization of the beam right after the exit of the ion source has been built with different instruments to measure the beam current and the transverse profile. In this paper the present status of the design, simulation and tests of the diagnostics for the AMIT cyclotron are described.
 
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MOPG49 A Precise Pulsed Current Source for Absolute Calibration of Current Measurement Systems With No DC Response power-supply, impedance, hardware, instrumentation 165
 
  • M. Krupa, M. Gąsior
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • M. Krupa
    TUL-DMCS, Łódź, Poland
 
  Absolute calibration of systems with no DC response requires pulsed calibration circuits. This paper presents a precise pulsed current source designed primarily for remote calibration of a beam intensity measurement system. However, due to its simple and flexible design, it might also prove interesting for other applications. The circuit was designed to drive a load of 10 Ω with current pulses lasting a few hundred microseconds with an amplitude of 1 A and precision in the order of 0.01%. The circuit is equipped with a half-bridge for precise determination of the absolute output current using the 0 V method. This paper presents the circuit topology and discusses in detail the choice of the critical components along with their influence on the final achieved accuracy. The performance of the built prototype of the current source is presented with laboratory measurements.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-MOPG49  
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MOPG59 Time Correlated Single Photon Counting Using Different Photon Detectors photon, detector, synchrotron, radiation 201
 
  • L. Torino, U. Iriso
    ALBA-CELLS Synchrotron, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain
 
  Time Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) is used in accelerators to measure the filling pattern and perform bunch purity measurements. The most used photon detectors are photomultipliers (PMTs), generally used to detect visible light; and Avalanche Photo-Diodes (APDs), which are often used to detect X-rays. At ALBA synchrotron light source, the TCSPC using a standard PMT has been developed and is currently in operation and further tests are performed using an APD. This work presents the experimental results using both detectors, and compares their performances.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-MOPG59  
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MOPG60 Development, Calibration and Application of New-Generation Dissectors With Picosecond Temporal Resolution electron, laser, radiation, synchrotron 205
 
  • O.I. Meshkov, O. Anchugov, G.Y. Kurkin, A.V. Petrozhitskii, D.A. Shvedov, E.I. Zinin
    BINP SB RAS, Novosibirsk, Russia
  • V.L. Dorokhov
    BINP, Novosibirsk, Russia
  • P.B. Gornostaev, M.Ya. Schelev, E.V. Shashkov, A. V. Smirnov, A.I. Zarovskii
    GPI, Moscow, Russia
 
  A dissector is an electron-optical device designed for measurement of periodic light pulses of subnanosecond and picosecond duration. LI-602 dissector developed at BINP SB RAS is widely used for routine measurements of a longitudinal profile of electron and positron beams at BINP electron-positron colliders and other similar installations. LI-602 dissector is a part of many optical diagnostic systems and provides temporal resolution of about 20 ps. Recently a new generation of picosecond dissectors were created on the basis of the PIF-01/S1 picosecond streak-image tube designed and manufactured at the GPI Photoelectronics Department. The results of the measurements of instrument function of the new dissector based on PIF-01/S1, which were carried out in the static mode, showed that temporal resolution of the dissector can be better than 3-4 ps (FWHM). The results of temporal resolution calibration of the new-generation picosecond dissector, carried out at the specialized set-up based on a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser, and recent results of longitudinal beam profile measurements at BINP accelerators are given in this work.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-MOPG60  
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MOPG63 Recent Beam Size Measurement Result Using Synchrotron Radiation Inteferometer in TPS synchrotron, radiation, synchrotron-radiation, shielding 217
 
  • M.L. Chen, H.C. Ho, K.H. Hsu, D.-G. Huang, C.K. Kuan, W.Y. Lai, C.J. Lin, S.Y. Perng, C.W. Tsai, T.C. Tseng, H.S. Wang
    NSRRC, Hsinchu, Taiwan
 
  Taiwan Photon Source (TPS) has operated in 2015. An optical diagnostic beam line is constructed in TPS 40th section for the diagnostics of the electron beam properties. One instrument of the optical diagnostic beam line is a synchrotron radiation interferometer, which is operated for monitoring the beam size. By improving the optical alignment and air disturbance, the beam size is performed stable. This paper presents the modifications and recent measurement results.  
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MOPG66 Design and Experimental Tests of the SwissFEL Wire-Scanners electron, vacuum, FEL, radiation 225
 
  • G.L. Orlandi, R. Ischebeck, C. Ozkan Loch, V. Schlott
    PSI, Villigen PSI, Switzerland
  • M. Ferianis, G. Penco
    Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Basovizza, Italy
 
  The SwissFEL wire-scanner (WSC) composes of an in-vacuum beam-probe - motorized by a stepper motor - and an out-vacuum pick-up of the wire-signal. In SwissFEL, WSCs will absolve two main tasks: high precision measurement of the beam profile for determining the beam emittance as a complement to view-screens; routine monitoring of the beam profile under FEL operations. In order to fulfill the aforementioned tasks, the design of the in-vacuum component of the SwissFEL WSCs followed the guidelines to ensure a mechanical stability of the scanning wire at the micrometer level as well as a significative containment of the radiation-dose release along the machine thanks to the choice of metallic wires with low density and Atomic number. Beam-loss monitors have been suitably designed to ensure a sufficient sensitivity and dynamics to detect signals from scanned beams in the charge range 10-200 pC. The design, the prototyping phases, the bench and electron-beam tests - performed at SITF (Paul Scherrer Institut) and FERMI (Elettra, Trieste) - of the entire SwissFEL WSC set-up will be presented.
Contribution accepted for publication in Physical Review Accelerators and Beams
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-MOPG66  
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MOPG68 Development and Commissioning of the Next Generation X-ray Beam Size Monitor in CESR detector, vacuum, alignment, storage-ring 229
 
  • N.T. Rider, S.T. Barrett, M.G. Billing, J.V. Conway, B.K. Heltsley, A.A. Mikhailichenko, D.P. Peterson, D. L. Rubin, J.P. Shanks, S. Wang
    Cornell University (CLASSE), Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, New York, USA
 
  Funding: Work supported by NSF grant PHY-0734867, PHY-1002467 and DOE grant DE-FC02-08ER41538, DE-SC0006505
The CESR Test Accelerator (CesrTA) program targets the study of beam physics issues relevant to linear collider damping rings and other low emittance storage rings. This endeavor requires new instrumentation to study the beam dynamics along trains of ultra-low emittance bunches. A key element of the program has been the design, commissioning and operation of an x-ray beam size monitor capable, on a turn by turn basis, of collecting single pass measurements of each individual bunch in a train over many thousands of turns. The x-ray beam size monitor development has matured to include the design of a new instrument which has been permanently integrated into the storage ring. A new beam line has been designed and constructed which allows for the extraction of x-rays from the positron beam using a newly developed electro magnet pair. This new instrument utilizes custom, high bandwidth amplifiers and digitization hardware and firmware to collect signals from a linear InGaAs diode array. This paper reports on the development of this new instrument and its integration into storage ring operation including vacuum component design, electromagnet design, electronics and capabilities.
 
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TUPG03 Accurate Bunch Resolved BPM System storage-ring, FPGA, detector, diagnostics 311
 
  • F. Falkenstern, F. Hoffmann, J. Kuszynski, M. Ries
    HZB, Berlin, Germany
 
  Operation with multiple beams stored on different orbits in storage rings as well as beam dynamics studies requires accurate and stable Beam Position Monitor (BPM) measurements for each individual bunch. Analog BPM systems are usually optimized for measuring the closed orbit, i.e. averaging over all buckets and many turns. Therefore no information about the position of individual bunches are supplied. The new bunch resolved BPM electronic, currently under development at HZB, is based on the analysis of RF-signals delivered by a set of four stripline / pick-up electrodes in each beam position monitor. It has a high spatial resolution over a wide range of bunch currents. Using the four well matched (phase and amplitude) bunch induced RF-signals in combination with a low jitter master clock and commercial data acquisition cards allow beam position measurements on a bunch to bunch basis with micrometer resolution. Experimental results obtained at BESSY II and MLS demonstrates the achieved performance of the setup and will be discussed in detail.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-TUPG03  
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TUPG10 LCLS-1 Cavity BPM Algorithm for Unlocked Digitizer Clock cavity, detector, timing, dipole 336
 
  • T. Straumann, S.R. Smith
    SLAC, Menlo Park, California, USA
 
  Funding: Work supported by U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC02-76SF00515
Cavity BPMs commonly use the fundamental TM010 mode (excited either in the x/y cavity itself or in a separate "reference" cavity) which is insensitive to beam position as a reference signal, not only for amplitude normalization but also as a phase/time reference to facilitate synchronous detection of the signal derived from the position-sensitive TM110 mode. When taking these signals into the digital domain the reference and position signals need to be acquired by a synchronous clock. However, unless this clock is also locked to the accelerating RF, absolute timing information is lost which affects the relative phase between reference and position signals (assuming they are not carefully tuned to the same frequency). This contribution presents a method for estimating the necessary time of arrival information based on the sampled reference signal which is used to make the signal detection insensitive to the phase of the digitizer clock. Running an unlocked digitizer clock allows for considerable simplification of infrastructure (cabling, PLLs) and thus decreases cost and eases maintenance.
 
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TUPG13 A New Stripline Kicker for PF-AR Transverse Feedback Damper kicker, impedance, feedback, damping 344
 
  • R. Takai, T. Honda, T. Nogami, T. Obina, Y. Tanimoto, M. Tobiyama
    KEK, Ibaraki, Japan
 
  A feedback damper equipped with a long stripline kicker was used to damp transverse beam oscillation at the Photon Factory Advanced Ring (PF-AR), which is a 6.5-GeV synchrotron radiation source of KEK. Recently, the stripline kicker was renewed to one having shorter electrodes and a smaller loss factor because its insulating support was broken by the beam-induced thermal stress and caused frequent electric discharges inducing dust trapping phenomena. In this paper, we present details of the new stripline kicker, from design to installation, as well as demonstrate results of beam oscillation damping obtained with the new kicker.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-TUPG13  
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TUPG15 Intra-Train Position and Angle Stabilisation at ATF Based on Sub-Micron Resolution Stripline Beam Position Monitors feedback, extraction, kicker, monitoring 348
 
  • N. Blaskovic Kraljevic, T. Bromwich, P. Burrows, G.B. Christian, C. Perry, R.L. Ramjiawan
    JAI, Oxford, United Kingdom
  • D.R. Bett
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  A low-latency, sub-micron resolution stripline beam position monitoring (BPM) system has been developed and tested with beam at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF2), where it has been used to drive a beam stabilisation system. The fast analogue front-end signal processor is based on a single-stage radio-frequency down-mixer, with a measured latency of 16 ns and a demonstrated single-pass beam position resolution of below 300 nm using a beam with a bunch charge of approximately 1 nC. The BPM position data are digitised on a digital feedback board which is used to drive a pair of kickers local to the BPMs and nominally orthogonal in phase in closed-loop feedback mode, thus achieving both beam position and angle stabilisation. We report the reduction in jitter as measured at a witness stripline BPM located 30 metres downstream of the feedback system and its propagation to the ATF interaction point.  
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DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-TUPG15  
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TUPG21 Beam-Loss Monitoring Signals of Interlocked Events at the J-PARC Linac linac, cavity, proton, EPICS 368
 
  • N. Hayashi, Y. Kato, A. Miura
    JAEA/J-PARC, Tokai-Mura, Naka-Gun, Ibaraki-Ken, Japan
  • K. Futatsukawa, T. Miyao
    KEK, Ibaraki, Japan
 
  It is important to understand why the beam gets lost during normal operation. If RF cavity gets interlocked due to its failure, it is understandable. But it is still useful to study its detail mechanism and which beam loss monitor (BLM) receives higher loss or it is more sensitive in order to reduce a numbers of interlocked events and stabilize the accelerator operation in future. The J-PARC Linac BLM has a simple data recorder system consists of multi-oscilloscopes. Although its functionality is limited, it can record events when an interlock is triggered. Particular interest is the events associate with only BLM MPS (Machine-Protection-System). They may reveal hidden problems in the accelerator.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-TUPG21  
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TUPG30 Testing the Untestable: A Realistic Vision of Fearlessly Testing (Almost) Every Single Accelerator Component Without Beam and Continuous Deployment Thereof hardware, software, simulation, luminosity 399
 
  • A. Calia, K. Fuchsberger, M. Hostettler
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  Whenever a bug of some piece of software or hardware stops beam operation, loss of time is rarely negligible and the cost (either in lost luminosity or real financial one) might be significant. Optimization of the accelerator availability is a strong motivation to avoid such kind of issues. Still, even at large accelerator labs like CERN, release cycles of many accelerator components are managed in a "deploy and pray" manner. In this paper we will give a short general overview on testing strategies used commonly in software development projects and illustrate their application on accelerator components, both hardware and software. Finally, several examples of CERN systems will be shown on which these techniques were or will be applied (LHC Beam-Based Feedbacks and LHC Luminosity Server) and describe why it is worth doing so.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-TUPG30  
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TUPG34 First Results from the IPHI Beam Instrumentation proton, diagnostics, rfq, beam-diagnostic 413
 
  • P. Ausset, M. Ben Abdillah, S. Berthelot, C. Joly, J. Lesrel, J.-F. Yaniche
    IPN, Orsay, France
  • D. Bogard, B. Pottin, D. Uriot
    CEA/DSM/IRFU, France
 
  I.P.H.I. is a High Intensity Proton Injector (C.N.R.S/I.N.2P.3; C.E.A./Irfu and C.E.R.N. collaboration) located at Saclay and now on operation. An E.C.R. source produces a 100 keV, 100 mA C.W. proton beams which will be accelerated at 3 MeV by a 4 vanes R.F.Q. operating at 352.2 MHz. Finally, a High Energy Beam Transport Line (H.E.B.T.) delivers the beam to a beam stopper. The HEBT is equipped with appropriate beam diagnostics to carry beam current, centroid beam transverse position, transverse beam profiles, beam energy and energy spread measurements for the commissioning of I.P.H.I. These beam diagnostics operate under both pulsed and C.W. operation. However transverse beam profile measurements are acquired under low duty factor pulsed beam operation using a slow wire scanner. The beam instrumentation of the H.E.B.T. is reviewed and the first measurements at 3 MeV are described.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-TUPG34  
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TUPG37 A PPS Compliant Injected Charge Monitor at NSLS-II timing, PLC, linac, monitoring 422
 
  • A. Caracappa, C. Danneil, R.P. Fliller, D. Padrazo, O. Singh
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
 
  Part of the NSLS-II Personnel Protection System (PPS), the Accumulated Charge Monitor Interlock (ACMI) was developed to ensure the Accelerator Safety Envelope (ASE) limits for charge generation in the NSLS-II Injector are never violated. The ACMI measures the amount of charge in each injection shot using an Integrating Current Transformer (ICT). For logistical reasons, adding a redundant ICT was impractical so in order to achieve the high reliability required for PPS this system is designed to perform self-tests by injecting calibrated charge pulses into a test coil on the ICT and analyzing the returning charge signal. The injector trigger rate is 1.97Hz and self-tests are performed 250 mSec after every trigger pulse. Despite the lack of a redundant charge measurement the ACMI achieved the high reliability rating required for PPS with a mean time between failure (MTBF) rate greater than 106 hours. The ACMI was commissioned in 2014 and has operated to date without any major problems. In 2015 a second ACMI system was commissioned at another location in the injection system.  
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TUPG38 A PPS Compliant Stored Beam Current Monitor at NSLS-II storage-ring, PLC, monitoring, diagnostics 426
 
  • A. Caracappa, C. Danneil, A.J. Della Penna, R.P. Fliller, D. Padrazo, O. Singh
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
 
  A requirement for top-off operations at the NSLS-II facility is at least 50mA stored ring current. The Stored Beam Current Monitor (SBCM) is part of the NSLS-II Personnel Protection System (PPS) that determines the storage ring current based on Pick-Up Electrode (PUE) readings. The SBCM selects the 500 MHz component of the PUE signal and downconverts it to about 2 MHz. The 2 MHz signal is rectified, averaged down to a bandwidth of 500 Hz, and compared to a threshold voltage equivalent to 55mA of stored beam. A redundant SBCM system was also constructed and these two systems must agree that the stored beam is above the threshold to enable top-off operations. The SBCM is also required to remain accurate over wide range of possible bunch patterns and bunch intensity distributions. Under normal conditions for top-off operations the SBCM measurement accuracy is about 1%. The SBCM was commissioned in 2015 as part of the Top-Off Safety System (TOSS) which is responsible for ensuring safe top-off operations at NSLS-II.  
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TUPG43 The Next Generation of Cryogenic Current Comparators for Beam Monitoring cryogenics, shielding, monitoring, niobium 441
 
  • V. Tympel, J. Golm, R. Neubert, P. Seidel
    FSU Jena, Jena, Germany
  • J. Golm, T. Stöhlker
    HIJ, Jena, Germany
  • F. Kurian, M. Schwickert, T. Sieber, T. Stöhlker
    GSI, Darmstadt, Germany
  • M. Schmelz, R. Stolz
    IPHT, Jena, Germany
  • T. Stöhlker
    IOQ, Jena, Germany
  • V. Zakosarenko
    Supracon AG, Jena, Germany
 
  Funding: Federal Ministry of Education and Research- BMBF, contract: 05P15SJRBA
A new Cryogenic Current Comparator with eXtended Dimensions (CCC-XD) is currently under development for a non-destructive, highly sensitive monitoring of nA-intensities of beams for larger beamline diameters planned for the new FAIR accelerator facility at GSI. The CCC consists of a superconducting coil which is read out by a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID), a flux concentrator and a superconducting shield. The new flux concentrator comprises of a specially designed, highly permeable core made of nanocrystalline material in order to assure a low-noise operation and a high system bandwidth of up to 200 kHz. The superconducting shielding of niobium has extended geometric dimensions and will suppress disturbing magnetic fields of the beamline environment effectively. New SQUID sensors with sub-μm-Josephson junctions enable extreme low-noise signals and high disturbance-suppression. The CCC-XD system and the new dedicated cryostat will be ready for testing in the CRYRING at GSI in 2017. Results from electrical measurements with the components of the new CCC-XD Setup will be presented in this work.
 
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TUPG44 Diagnoses and Controls of Single e-Pulse Extraction at LCLS-I for the ESTB Program extraction, kicker, feedback, controls 445
 
  • J.C. Sheppard, T.G. Beukers, W.S. Colocho, F.-J. Decker, A.A. Lutman, B.D. McKee, T.J. Smith, M.K. Sullivan
    SLAC, Menlo Park, California, USA
 
  A pulsed magnet is used to kick single electron bunches into the SLAC A-line from the 120 Hz LCLS-1 bunch train. These single bunches are transported to the End Station Test Beam facility. It is mandated that extraction from the LCLS beam does not disturb the non-kicked pulses. An 8 mrad kick is required to extract a bunch; without compensation the following bunch experiences a 2 urad kick; with compensation this kick is reduced to about 0.1 urad which is well within the jitter level of about 0.3 urad. Electron and photon diagnostics were used to identify problems arising from eddy currents, beam feedback errors, and inadequate monitoring and control protocol. This paper discusses the efforts to diagnose, remedy, and control the pulse snatching.  
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TUPG49 Review of Chromaticity Measurement Approaches Using Head-Tail Phase Shift Method at RHIC synchrotron, simulation, betatron, emittance 457
 
  • V.H. Ranjbar, A. Marusic, M.G. Minty
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
 
  Funding: Work supported the URA., Inc., under contract DE-AC02-76CH03000 with the U.S. Dept. of Energy
We review tests of the head-tail phase shift method using various approaches at BNL's RHIC. Both the standard and some more exotic approaches to measure the phase differential between the head and tail of a bunched beam has been attempted at RHIC. The standard kick beam and measured phase evolution of the head and tail of a given bunch has been tried at RHIC. Additionally a more exotic approach to measure the head versus tail phase difference has been tried. In this approach we used a BBQ pickup and kicker with the input stripline signal to the BBQ mixed with a nano second pulse timed to the head and tail of the bunch. In this way we hoped to force the BBQ to sample the head or tail of the bunch depending on the pulse timing. We report on the results and challenges which each approach presented.
 
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TUPG50 Status of Beam Current Transformer Developments for FAIR ion, extraction, feedback, synchrotron 461
 
  • M. Schwickert, F. Kurian, H. Reeg, T. Sieber
    GSI, Darmstadt, Germany
  • K. Hofmann
    TU Darmstadt, Darmstadt, Germany
  • F. Kurian
    HIJ, Jena, Germany
  • R. Neubert, P. Seidel
    FSU Jena, Jena, Germany
  • E. Soliman
    German University in Cairo, New Cairo City, Egypt
 
  In view of the upcoming FAIR project (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) several long-term development projects had been initiated with regard to diagnostic devices for beam current measurement. The main accelerator of FAIR will be the fast ramped superconducting synchrotron SIS100. Design parameters of SIS100 are acceleration of 2.5·1013 protons/cycle to 29 GeV for the production of antiprotons, as well as acceleration and slow extraction of p to U ions at 109 ions/s in the energy range of 0.4-2.7 GeV/u and extraction times of up to 10 s. For high-intensity operation non-intercepting devices are mandatory, thus the developments presented in this contribution focus on purpose-built beam current transformers. First prototype measurements of a dc current transformer based on a Tunneling Magneto Resistance sensor are presented, as well as recent achievements with a SQUID-based Cryogenic Current Comparator.  
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TUPG66 High-Energy X-Ray Pinhole Camera for High-Resolution Electron Beam Size Measurements detector, photon, emittance, electron 504
 
  • B.X. Yang, S.H. Lee, J.W. Morgan, H. Shang
    ANL, Argonne, Illinois, USA
 
  Funding: Work supported by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.
The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is developing the design of a multi-bend achromat (MBA) lattice based storage ring as the next major upgrade, featuring a 20-fold reduction in emittance. Combining the reduction of beta functions, the electron beam sizes at bend magnet sources may be reduced to reach 5 - 10 μm for 10% vertical coupling. The x-ray pinhole camera currently used for beam size monitoring will not be adequate for the new task. By increasing the operating photon energy to 120 keV or higher, the pinhole camera's resolution is expected to reach below 4 μm. The peak height of the pinhole image will be used to monitor relative changes of the beam sizes and enable the feedback control of the emittance. We present the computer simulation and the design of a prototype beam size monitor for the APS storage ring.
 
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WEAL02 The Wall Current Transformer - a New Sensor for Precise Bunch-by-Bunch Intensity Measurements in the LHC vacuum, impedance, instrumentation, network 568
 
  • M. Krupa, M. Gąsior
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  The Wall Current Transformer (WCT) is a new bunch-by-bunch intensity monitor developed by the CERN Beam Instrumentation Group to overcome the performance issues of commercial Fast Beam Current Transformers (FBCT) observed during Run 1 of the LHC. In the WCT the large magnetic cores commonly used in FBCTs are replaced with small RF transformers distributed around the beam pipe. Rather than directly measuring the beam current, the WCT measures the image current induced by the beam on the walls of the vacuum chamber. The image current is forced to flow through a number of screws which form the single-turn primary windings of the RF transformers. The signals of the secondary windings are combined and the resulting pulse is filtered, amplified and sent to the acquisition system. This paper presents the principle of operation of the WCT and its performance based on laboratory and beam measurements.  
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WECL02 Accurate Measurement of the MLS Electron Storage Ring Parameters electron, storage-ring, radiation, synchrotron 600
 
  • R. Klein, G. Brandt, T. Reichel, R. Thornagel
    PTB, Berlin, Germany
  • J. Feikes, M. Ries, I. Seiler
    HZB, Berlin, Germany
 
  The use of the Metrology Light Source (MLS), the electron storage ring of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB, the German national metrology institute) as a primary radiation source standard requires the accurate measurement of all storage ring parameters needed for the calculation of the spectral radiant intensity of the synchrotron radiation. Therefore, instrumentation has been installed in the MLS for the measurement of, e.g., the electron beam energy, the electron beam current or the electron beam size that outperforms that usually installed in electron storage rings used as a common synchrotron radiation source. We report on the status and improvements in the storage ring parameter measurement.  
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WECL03 Measurement of the Beam Response to Quadrupole Kick by Using Stripline Pickup Monitor at J-PARC Main Ring kicker, quadrupole, resonance, betatron 604
 
  • Y. Nakanishi, A. Ichikawa, A. Ichikawa, A. Minamino, K.G. Nakamura, T. Nakaya
    Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
  • T. Koseki, H. Kuboki, M. Okada, T. Toyama
    KEK, Tokai, Ibaraki, Japan
 
  Funding: Work supported by MEXT KAKENHI, GA 25105002, Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas titled "Unification and Development of the Neutrino Science Frontier"
In high intensity proton synchrotrons, linear and nonlinear betatron resonances cause beam loss. When the betatron tune spreads over a resonance line, the oscillation amplitude will get larger, causing a large beam loss. Our study aims for a direct measurement of the betatron tune spread by using a quadrupole kicker and a 4-electrode monitor. The monochromatic rf signal is inputted to the kicker and we induce an oscillation by kicking the beam. The amplitude of the quadrupole oscillation will depend on the number of particles having a certain tune. In the beam test at J-PARC MR, the dipole kicker was used as a quadrupole kicker by exciting the two facing electrodes in-phase. We measured the response to the kick at several frequencies. We observed that the amplitude depends on the kicker frequency and the number of particles per bunch. This demonstrates that the quadrupole oscillation can be induced by a kicker and the possibility of measuring the number of a particular tune particle from the response. We will present the result of the beam test and our prospect and the comparison between the experimental result and a numerical calculation.
 
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WEPG06 Orbit Feedforward and Feedback Applications in the Taiwan Light Source feedback, power-supply, controls, insertion 623
 
  • C.H. Kuo, P.C. Chiu, K.T. Hsu, K.H. Hu
    NSRRC, Hsinchu, Taiwan
 
  Taiwan Light Source (TLS) is a 1.5 GeV third-generation light source with circumference 120 meters. TLS is operated at 360 mA top-up injection mode. The storage ring is 6-fold symmetry with 6-meter straight sections for injection, RF cavity, and insertion devices. There are three undulators were installed in three straight sections to delivery VUV and soft X-ray for users. Beside there undulators, a conventional wiggler (W200 installed at straight sections to provide hard X-ray to serve user. Working parameters of hard X-ray sources are fixed without cause problem on operation. However, undulators should be changing its working parameters during user experiments performed. These undulator during its gap/phase changing will create orbit perturbation due to its field errors. Orbit feedback is main tool to keep orbit without change. However, some correctors setting of the orbit feedback system are easy to saturation due to large perturbation come from U90. To keep functionality of the orbit feedback system working in good condition, combines with orbit feedback and feed-forward is proposed and reported in this conference.  
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WEPG11 Operation of the Beam Position Monitor for the Spiral 2 Linac on the Test Bench of the RFQ electronics, linac, diagnostics, rfq 642
 
  • P. Ausset, M. Ben Abdillah, F. Fournier
    IPN, Orsay, France
  • S.K. Bharade, G. Joshi, P.D. Motiwala
    BARC, Trombay, Mumbai, India
  • R. Ferdinand, D.T. Touchard
    GANIL, Caen, France
 
  The SPIRAL2 project is based on a multi-beam superconducting LINAC designed to accelerate 5 mA deuteron beams up to 40 MeV, proton beams up to 33 MeV and 1 mA light and heavy ions (Q/A = 1/3) up to 14.5 MeV/A. The accurate tuning of the LINAC is essential for the operation of SPIRAL2 and requires measurement of the beam transverse position, the phase of the beam with respect to the radiofrequency voltage, the ellipticity of the beam and the beam energy with the help of Beam Position Monitor (BPM) system. The commissioning of the RFQ gave us the opportunity to install a BPM sensor, associated with its electronics, mounted on a test bench. The test bench is a D-plate fully equipped with a complete set of beam diagnostic equipment in order to characterize as completely as possible the beam delivered by the RFQ and to gain experience with the behavior of these diagnostics under beam operation. This paper addresses the first measurements carried with the BPM on the D-plate: intensity, phase, transverse position and ellipticity under 750 keV proton beam operation  
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WEPG22 Relation between Signals of the Beam Loss Monitors and Residual Radiation in the J-PARC RCS beam-losses, radiation, proton, vacuum 673
 
  • M. Yoshimoto, H. Harada, M. Kinsho, K. Yamamoto
    JAEA/J-PARC, Tokai-Mura, Naka-Gun, Ibaraki-Ken, Japan
 
  The most important issue in realizing such a MW-class high-power routine beam operation is to keep machine activations within a permissible level, that is, to preserve a better hands-on-maintenance environment. Thus, a large fraction of our effort has been concentrated on reducing and managing beam losses. To validate the beam loss optimizations, residual radiation measurement along the ring provide us with further information. By relating signals of the beam loss monitors with the measured distribution of the residual radiation, achievements of the high power beam operation will be described. In this presentation, we will report on the measurement results of residual radiation distribution along the ring together with the relation with the beam loss signals.  
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WEPG56 Single-Shot THz Spectroscopy for the Characterization of Single-Bunch Bursting CSR detector, impedance, radiation, electron 778
 
  • J. Raasch, M. Arndt, J. Hänisch, K.S. Ilin, K. Kuzmin, A.-S. Müller, A. Schmid, M. Siegel, J.L. Steinmann, S. Wuensch
    KIT, Karlsruhe, Germany
  • G. Cinque, M. Frogley
    DLS, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
  • B. Holzapfel
    Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany
 
  Funding: The work was supported by the BMBF (05K13VK4), the Helmholtz International Research School for Teratronics & the Karlsruhe School of Elementary Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
An integrated array of narrow-band high-Tc YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) detectors embedded in broad-band readout was developed for the future use at synchrotron light sources as a single-shot terahertz (THz) spectrometer. The detection system consists of up to four thin-film YBCO nanobridges fed by planar double-slit antennas covering the frequency range from 140 GHz up to 1 THz. We present first results obtained at the ANKA storage ring and at Diamond Light Source during operation of two and four frequency-selective YBCO detectors, respectively.
 
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WEPG71 3D Density Scans of a Supersonic Gas Jet for Beam Profile Monitoring ion, diagnostics, timing, electron 815
 
  • H.D. Zhang, V. Tzoganis, C.P. Welsch, W. Widmann
    Cockcroft Institute, Warrington, Cheshire, United Kingdom
  • V. Tzoganis, C.P. Welsch, W. Widmann, H.D. Zhang
    The University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom
 
  Funding: STFC Cockcroft and EU under GA 215080.
A beam profile monitor based on a supersonic gas jet was successfully tested at the Cockcroft Institute. This monitor can be used for a large variety of beams over a large energy range, including high intensity/high energy beams with large destructive power which make the use of many commonly used diagnostics impossible, and beams with a short life time which require minimum interference of the diagnostics. The achievable resolution of this type of monitor depends on the jet thickness and homogeneity. Detailed knowledge of the jet density profile is hence of high importance. In this contribution we present how a moveable vacuum gauge was successfully used to investigate the 3D density distribution of the jet. We compare the experimental data to results from simulations and discuss how the findings can help further improve of the overall jet design.
 
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WEPG75 The Beam Profile Monitoring System for the CERN IRRAD Proton Facility proton, detector, data-acquisition, radiation 825
 
  • F. Ravotti, B. Gkotse, M. Glaser, E. Matli, G. Pezzullo
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • K.K. Gan, H. Kagan, S. Smith, J.D. Warner
    Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA
 
  Funding: Project funded by AIDA project and the EU H2020 Research and Innovation programme, GA n. 654168.
In High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments, devices are required to withstand high radiation levels. As a result, detectors and electronics sitting in the inner detector layers must be irradiated to determine their radiation tolerance. To perform these irradiations, CERN built during LS1 a new irradiation facility in the East Area at the Proton Synchrotron (PS) accelerator. At this facility, named IRRAD, a high-intensity 24 GeV/c proton beam is used. During beam steering and irradiation, the intensity and the transverse profile of the proton beam are monitored online. The IRRAD Beam Profile Monitor (BPM) uses a set of four 39-channel pixel detectors constructed using thin foil copper pads positioned on a flex circuit. When protons pass through the copper pads, they induce a measurable current. To measure this current a new data acquisition system was designed as well as a new database and on-line display system. In this work, we present the design and the architecture of the IRRAD BPM system, some results on its performance with the proton beam, as well as its planned upgrades, including its utilization for monitoring irradiations with an intense 300MeV/c positive pion beam at PSI.
 
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WEPG77 Sub-fs Resolution with the Enhanced Operation of the X-band Transverse Deflecting Cavity using an RF pulse Compression SLED Cavity cavity, klystron, electron, photon 833
 
  • P. Krejcik, G.B. Bowden, S. Condamoor, Y. Ding, V.A. Dolgashev, J.P. Eichner, M.A. Franzi, A.A. Haase, J.R. Lewandowski, T.J. Maxwell, S.G. Tantawi, J.W. Wang, L. Xiao, C. Xu
    SLAC, Menlo Park, California, USA
 
  Funding: Work supported by DOE contract DE-AC03-76SF00515.
The successful operation of the x-band transverse deflecting cavity (XTCAV) installed downstream of the LCLS undulator has been further enhanced by the recent addition of an RF pulse compression "SLED" cavity that doubles the temporal resolving power of this powerful diagnostic system for measurement of the longitudinal profile of both the electron bunch and the x-ray FEL pulse. RF pulse compression has allowed us to use the existing SLAC X-band klystron with nominal output power of 50 MW and extend the RF pulse length by a factor 4 to give us 4 times the peak power after compression. A new, innovative SLED cavity was designed and built at SLAC to operate efficiently at X-band*. The elegant design uses a small spherical cavity combined with a polarizing mode coupler hybrid. We will report on the installation, commissioning and beam measurements demonstrating the sub-femtosecond resolution of the XTCAV system.
*J.W. Wang et al., "R&D of a Super-compact SLED System at SLAC", in Proc. 7th International Particle Accelerator Conference (IPAC'16), Busan, Korea, May 2016, paper MOOCA01, pp. 39-41.
 
poster icon Poster WEPG77 [20.909 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-WEPG77  
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THAL02 Recent Developments for Instability Monitoring at the LHC injection, diagnostics, pick-up, network 852
 
  • T.E. Levens, K. Łasocha, T. Lefèvre
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  A limiting factor on the maximum beam intensity that can be stored in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the growth of transverse beam instabilities. Understanding and mitigating these effects requires a good knowledge of the beam parameters during the instability in order to identify the cause and provide the necessary corrections. This paper presents the suite of beam diagnostics that have been put into operation to monitor these beam instabilities and the development of a trigger system to allow measurements to be made synchronously with multiple instruments as soon as any instability is detected.  
slides icon Slides THAL02 [15.591 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-THAL02  
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