Charge Monitors and Other Instruments
Paper Title Page
MOCL01
FCUP Award  
 
  • K. Jordan
    JLab, Newport News, Virginia, USA
  • U. Iriso
    ALBA-CELLS Synchrotron, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain
 
  The Faraday Cup (FCUP) Award was born in 1989 during the first Beam Instrumentation Workshop (BIW) held at Brookhaven National Lab (USA). Since the merging of the American BIW and the European DIPAC conferences into the, now, International Beam Instrumentation Conference, IBIC, this prize is sponsored by the conference itself and it is the first time the Faraday Cup is awarded in this new model. During this presentation, the FCUP winner will be announced and he/she will present his/her novel work. More information can be found at: https://www.faraday-cup.com/  
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MOCL02 Harmonically Resonant Cavity as a Bunch Length Monitor 24
 
  • B.F. Roberts, M.H. Pablo
    Electrodynamic, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
  • M.M. Ali
    ODU, Norfolk, Virginia, USA
  • E. Forman, J.M. Grames, F.E. Hannon, R. Kazimi, W. Moore, M. Poelker
    JLab, Newport News, Virginia, USA
 
  Funding: US DOE DE-SC0009509
RF cavities have been designed and constructed that simultaneously and exclusively resonate many harmonic TMono modes. These modes are axially symmetric and have their electric field maximum along the cavities bore. A periodic beam passing through a harmonic cavities bore excites these modes whose superposition can be measured at the cavities antenna with a sampling oscilloscope. Processing the detected waveform with the harmonic cavities transfer function yields the Fourier series of the beam, and a near real-time, non-invasive measurement of the beams longitudinal bunch shape and duration. Experiments have been performed on the 130 kV injector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facilities Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility. The harmonic cavities sensitivity was near 1 mV/μA and measured beam bunches ranging in width from 45 to 150 picoseconds (FWHM). These measurements were in close agreement with measurements made using an invasive bunch measurement system as well as predictions by a particle tracking simulations.
 
slides icon Slides MOCL02 [11.027 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-MOCL02  
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MOPG35 Single Pulse Sub-Picocoulomb Charge Measured by a Turbo-ICT in a Laser Plasma Accelerator 119
 
  • F. Stulle, J.F. Bergoz
    BERGOZ Instrumentation, Saint Genis Pouilly, France
  • W. Leemans, K. Nakamura
    LBNL, Berkeley, California, USA
 
  Funding: The work by the BELLA Center scientists and staff was supported by Office of Science, Office of HEP, US DOE under Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231 and the National Science Foundation.
Experiments at the Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) verified that the Turbo-ICT allows high resolution charge measurements even in the presence of strong background signals. For comparison, a Turbo-ICT and a conventional ICT were installed on the BELLA petawatt beamline, both sharing the same vacuum flanges. We report on measurements performed using a gas-jet and a capillary-discharge based laser plasma accelerator. In both setups the Turbo-ICT was able to resolve sub-picocoulomb charges.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-MOPG35  
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MOPG36 Timing Window and Optimization for Position Resolution and Energy Calibration of Scintillation Detector 123
 
  • J. Zhu, M.H. Fang, J. Wang, Z.Y. Wei
    NUAA, Nanjing, People's Republic of China
 
  The real event selection, timing resolution, position resolution and energy response of the EJ-200 plastic scintillation detector have been analyzed using timing window coincidence measurement. The detector was simulated based on Monte Carlo, including its geometry, energy deposition, photon collection and signal generation. The detection efficiency and the real events selection have been obtained while the background noise has been reduced by using two-end readout timing window coincidence. We developed an off-line analysis code, which is suitable for massive data from the digitizer. We set different coincidence timing windows, and did the off-line data processing respectively. We find the detection efficiency increases as the width of the timing window increases, and when the width of timing window is more than 10ns, the detection efficiency will slowly grow until it reaches saturation. Time, position and energy response have been measured by exposing to radioactive sources. The best timing window parameter as 16ns is obtained for on-line coincidence measurement, and the position resolution is up to 12cm. Energy response of the detector was linear within the experimental energy range*.
* L. Karsch, A. Bohm et al, "Design and Test of A Large-area Scintillation Detector for Fast Neutrons", Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A, vol.460, pp.362-367, 2001.
 
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DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-MOPG36  
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MOPG37 Comparative Study of Magnetic Properties for CERN Beam Current Transformers 127
 
  • S. Aguilera, H. Hofmann, P. Odier
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • S. Aguilera, H. Hofmann
    EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland
 
  At CERN, the circulating beam current measurement is provided by two types of transformer, the Direct Current Current Transformer and the Fast Beam Current Transformer. Each transformer is built based on toroidal cores made from a soft magnetic material. Depending on the type of measurement to be performed these cores require different magnetic characteristics for parameters such as permeability, coercivity and the shape of the magnetisation curve. In order to study the effect of changes in these parameters on the current transformers, several interesting raw materials based on their as-cast properties were selected. The materials have been characterised to determine their crystallisation, melting and Curie Temperatures in order to determine suitable annealing processes to tailor their properties. They have been analysed by several techniques including Electron Microscopy and X-ray Diffraction. As-cast magnetic properties such as the permeability, the B-H curve and Barkhausen noise have also been measured to enable the study of the effect of thermal treatment in the microstructure of the alloys, and the correlation of this with the change in the magnetic properties.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-MOPG37  
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MOPG38 Characterization and Simulations of Electron Beams Produced From Linac-Based Intense THz Radiation Source 131
 
  • N. Chaisueb, S. Rimjaem, J. Saisut
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand
  • N. Kangrang
    Chiang Mai University, PBP Research Facility, Chiang Mai, Thailand
 
  Electron beams with a maximum energy of 2.5 MeV and a macropulse current of 1 A are produced from a thermionic RF-gun of the linear accelerator system at Chiang Mai University, Thailand. An RF rectangular waveguide and a side coupling cavity of the RF gun introduce asymmetric field distribution inside the gun cavities. To investigate the effect of the asymmetric field distribution on electron beam production and acceleration, measurements and simulations of the electron beam properties were performed. In this study we use well calibrated current transformers, alpha magnet energy slits, and a Michelson interferometer to measure the electron pulse current, the beam energy, and the bunch length, respectively. This paper presents the measurement data of the electron beam properties at various location along the beam transport line and compares the results with the beam dynamic simulations by using the particle tracking program ELEGANT. Moreover, the RF field feature and the cathode power were optimized in order to achieve the high qualities of the electron beam produced from the RF gun. This result implies and correlates to the electron back-bombardment effect inside the gun cavities.
* This work has been supported by the Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Faculty of science, Chiang Mai University, and the Science Achievement Scholarship of Thailand (SAST).
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-MOPG38  
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MOPG39 Upgrade of the LHC Bunch by Bunch Intensity Measurement Acquisition System 135
 
  • D. Belohrad, D. Esperante Pereira, J. Kral, S.B. Pedersen
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  The fast beam intensity measurement systems for the LHC currently use an analogue signal processing chain to provide the charge information for individual bunches. This limits the possibility to use higher level correction algorithms to remove systematic measurement errors coming from the beam current transformer and the associated analogue electronics chain. In addition, the current measurement system requires individual settings for different types of beams, implying the need for continuous tuning during LHC operation. Using modern technology, the analogue measurement chain can be replaced by an entirely digital acquisition system, even in a case of the short, pulsed signals produced by the LHC beams. This paper discusses the implementation of the new digital acquisition system and the calculations required to reconstruct the individual LHC bunch intensities, along with the presentation of results from actual beam measurements.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-MOPG39  
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MOPG40 Performance Studies of a Single Vertical Beam Halo Collimation System at ATF2 139
 
  • N. Fuster-Martínez, A. Faus-Golfe
    IFIC, Valencia, Spain
  • P. Bambade, A. Faus-Golfe, S. Wallon, R.J. Yang
    LAL, Orsay, France
  • K. Kubo, T. Okugi, T. Tauchi, N. Terunuma
    Sokendai, Ibaraki, Japan
  • K. Kubo, T. Okugi, T. Tauchi, N. Terunuma
    KEK, Ibaraki, Japan
  • I. Podadera, F. Toral
    CIEMAT, Madrid, Spain
 
  Funding: Work supported by IDC-20101074, FPA2013-47883-C2-1-P and ANR-11-IDEX-0003-02
In order to reduce the background that could limit the precision of the diagnostics located in the ATF2 post-IP beamline, a single vertical beam halo collimation system was installed in March 2016. In this paper we present the measurements done in March and May 2016 in order to characterize the collimation system performance. Furthermore, the collimator wakefield impact has also been measured and compared with theoretical calculations and numerical simulations in order to determine the most efficient operation mode of the collimation system in terms of halo cleaning and negligible wakefield impact.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-MOPG40  
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MOPG41 A New Wall Current Monitor for the CERN Proton Synchrotron 143
 
  • J.M. Belleman, W. Andreazza
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • A.A. Nosych
    ALBA-CELLS Synchrotron, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain
 
  Wall Current Monitors are the devices of choice to observe the instantaneous beam current in proton accelerators. These entirely passive transformers deliver a high-fidelity image of the beam intensity in a bandwidth spanning from about 100kHz up to several GHz. They serve as a signal source for a diverse set of applications including Low Level RF feedback and longitudinal diagnostics such as bunch shape measurements and phase-space tomography. They are appreciated for their excellent reliability, large bandwidth and unsurpassed dynamic range. We describe the design of a new Wall Current Monitor for the CERN Proton Synchrotron with a useful bandwidth of 100kHz to 4GHz. Two such devices have been installed in the PS machine and are now used in regular operation. Some usage examples will be shown.  
poster icon Poster MOPG41 [1.728 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-MOPG41  
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MOPG42 Test Results from the Atlas Hybrid Particle Detector Prototype 147
 
  • C. Dickerson, B. DiGiovine, L.Y. Lin
    ANL, Argonne, Illinois, USA
  • D. Santiago-Gonzalez
    LSU, Baton Rouge, USA
 
  Funding: This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357.
At the Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System (ATLAS) we designed and built a hybrid particle detector consisting of a gas ionization chamber followed by an inorganic scintillator. This detector will aid the tuning of low intensity beam constituents, typically radioactive, with relatively high intensity (>100x) contaminants. These conditions are regularly encountered during radioactive ion beam production via the in-flight method, or when charge breeding fission fragments from the CAlifornium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU). The detector was designed to have an energy resolution of ~5% at a rate of 105 particles per second (pps), to generate energy loss and residual energy signals for the identification of both Z and A, to be compact (retractable from the beamline), and to be radiation hard. The combination of a gas ionization chamber and scintillator will enable the detector to be very versatile and be useful for a wide range of masses and energies. Design details and testing results from the prototype detector are presented in this paper.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-MOPG42  
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MOPG48 Optimized Cryogenic Current Comparator for CERN's Low-Energy Antiproton Facilities 161
 
  • M.F. Fernandes, D. Alves, T. Koettig, A. Lees, E. Oponowicz, J. Tan
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • M.F. Fernandes, C.P. Welsch
    The University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom
  • R. Geithner, R. Neubert, T. Stöhlker
    HIJ, Jena, Germany
  • R. Geithner, R. Neubert, T. Stöhlker
    IOQ, Jena, Germany
  • M. Schwickert
    GSI, Darmstadt, Germany
  • C.P. Welsch
    Cockcroft Institute, Warrington, Cheshire, United Kingdom
 
  Funding: This project has received funding from the European Unions Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement number 289485.
Non-perturbative measurement of low-intensity charged particle beams is particularly challenging for beam diagnostics due to the low amplitude of the induced electromagnetic fields. In the low-energy Antiproton Decelerator (AD) and the future Extra Low ENergy Antiproton (ELENA) rings at CERN, an absolute measurement of the beam intensity is essential to monitor operational efficiency and provide important calibration data for all AD experiments. Cryogenic Current Comparators (CCC) based on Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) have in the past been used for the measurement of beams in the nA range, showing a very good current resolution. However these were unable to provide a measurement of short bunched beams, due to the slew-rate limitation of SQUID devices and their strong susceptibility to external perturbations. Here, we present the measurements and results obtained during 2016 with a CCC system developed for the Antiproton Decelerator, which has been optimized to overcome these earlier limitations in terms of current resolution, system stability, the ability to cope with short bunched beams, and immunity to mechanical vibrations.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-MOPG48  
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MOPG49 A Precise Pulsed Current Source for Absolute Calibration of Current Measurement Systems With No DC Response 165
 
  • M. Krupa, M. Gąsior
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • M. Krupa
    TUL-DMCS, Łódź, Poland
 
  Absolute calibration of systems with no DC response requires pulsed calibration circuits. This paper presents a precise pulsed current source designed primarily for remote calibration of a beam intensity measurement system. However, due to its simple and flexible design, it might also prove interesting for other applications. The circuit was designed to drive a load of 10 Ω with current pulses lasting a few hundred microseconds with an amplitude of 1 A and precision in the order of 0.01%. The circuit is equipped with a half-bridge for precise determination of the absolute output current using the 0 V method. This paper presents the circuit topology and discusses in detail the choice of the critical components along with their influence on the final achieved accuracy. The performance of the built prototype of the current source is presented with laboratory measurements.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-MOPG49  
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TUAL01
Microbunching Measurement Techniques in Storage Rings  
 
  • A.-S. Müller
    FZK, Karlsruhe, Germany
  • A.-S. Müller
    KIT, Karlsruhe, Germany
 
  Micro-Bunch-Instabilities are one of the limits of single bunch charge in storage rings, particularly in low-alpha operation. This talk will give an overview over recent advances in the development of methods and technologies for the observation and characterization of these instabilities. Examples will illustrate the performance and possibilities of the different techniques.  
slides icon Slides TUAL01 [63.268 MB]  
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TUPG37 A PPS Compliant Injected Charge Monitor at NSLS-II 422
 
  • A. Caracappa, C. Danneil, R.P. Fliller, D. Padrazo, O. Singh
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
 
  Part of the NSLS-II Personnel Protection System (PPS), the Accumulated Charge Monitor Interlock (ACMI) was developed to ensure the Accelerator Safety Envelope (ASE) limits for charge generation in the NSLS-II Injector are never violated. The ACMI measures the amount of charge in each injection shot using an Integrating Current Transformer (ICT). For logistical reasons, adding a redundant ICT was impractical so in order to achieve the high reliability required for PPS this system is designed to perform self-tests by injecting calibrated charge pulses into a test coil on the ICT and analyzing the returning charge signal. The injector trigger rate is 1.97Hz and self-tests are performed 250 mSec after every trigger pulse. Despite the lack of a redundant charge measurement the ACMI achieved the high reliability rating required for PPS with a mean time between failure (MTBF) rate greater than 106 hours. The ACMI was commissioned in 2014 and has operated to date without any major problems. In 2015 a second ACMI system was commissioned at another location in the injection system.  
poster icon Poster TUPG37 [2.212 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-TUPG37  
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TUPG38 A PPS Compliant Stored Beam Current Monitor at NSLS-II 426
 
  • A. Caracappa, C. Danneil, A.J. Della Penna, R.P. Fliller, D. Padrazo, O. Singh
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
 
  A requirement for top-off operations at the NSLS-II facility is at least 50mA stored ring current. The Stored Beam Current Monitor (SBCM) is part of the NSLS-II Personnel Protection System (PPS) that determines the storage ring current based on Pick-Up Electrode (PUE) readings. The SBCM selects the 500 MHz component of the PUE signal and downconverts it to about 2 MHz. The 2 MHz signal is rectified, averaged down to a bandwidth of 500 Hz, and compared to a threshold voltage equivalent to 55mA of stored beam. A redundant SBCM system was also constructed and these two systems must agree that the stored beam is above the threshold to enable top-off operations. The SBCM is also required to remain accurate over wide range of possible bunch patterns and bunch intensity distributions. Under normal conditions for top-off operations the SBCM measurement accuracy is about 1%. The SBCM was commissioned in 2015 as part of the Top-Off Safety System (TOSS) which is responsible for ensuring safe top-off operations at NSLS-II.  
poster icon Poster TUPG38 [2.834 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-TUPG38  
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TUPG40 The Cherenkov Detector for Proton Flux Measurement (CpFM) in the UA9 Experiment 430
 
  • S. Montesano, W. Scandale
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • F.M. Addesa, G. Cavoto, F. Iacoangeli
    INFN-Roma, Roma, Italy
  • L. Burmistrov, S. Dubos, V. Puill, W. Scandale, A. Stocchi
    LAL, Orsay, France
 
  The UA9 experiment at the CERN SPS investigates the possibility to use bent crystals to steer particles in high energy accelerators. In this framework the CpFM have been developed to measure the beam particle flux in different experimental situations. Thin movable fused-silica bars installed in the SPS primary vacuum and intercepting the incoming particles are used to radiate Cherenkov light. The light signal is collected outside the beam pipe through a quartz optical window by radiation hard PMTs. The PMT signal is readout by the WaveCatcher acquisition board, which provides count rate as well as waveform information over a configurable time window. A bundle of optical fibers can be used to transport the light signal far from the beam pipe, allowing to reduce the radiation dose to the PMT. A first version of the CpFM has been successfully commissioned during the data taking runs of the UA9 Experiment in 2015, while a second version has been installed in the TT20 extraction line of the SPS in 2016. In this contribution the design choices will be presented and the final version of the detector will be described in detail.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-TUPG40  
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TUPG41 Development of High Resolution Beam Current Measurement System for COSY-Jülich 434
 
  • Y. Valdau, S. Mikirtytchiants, S. Trusov
    FZJ, Jülich, Germany
  • L. Eltcov
    Universität Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut für Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Bonn, Germany
  • P. Wuestner
    Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich, Germany
 
  An experiment to test the Time Reversal Invariance at COSY (TRIC) is under the preparation at the Forschungszentrum Jülich. This experiment requires a precise measurement of the beam life time. A high resolution beam current measurement system, based on Fast Current Transformer (FCT), is under the development for the COSY storage ring. The signal from the FCT is measured by a modern lock-in amplifier which is read out by a dedicated DAQ over an Ethernet. Additional instruments, equipped with Ethernet interface, can be implemented into this DAQ and read out synchronously with other systems necessary for the TRIC experiment. Relative resolution of 10-4, sufficient for the TRIC experiment, has been demonstrated at the test bench in the laboratory. Preliminary results of the system commissioning at COSY will be presented.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-TUPG41  
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TUPG42 Design of a Very Compact 130 MeV Møller Polarimeter for the S-DALINAC 438
 
  • T. Bahlo, J. Enders, T. Kürzeder, N. Pietralla, J. Wissmann
    TU Darmstadt, Darmstadt, Germany
 
  Funding: Supported by the DFG through grants SFB 634 and GRK 2128
At the Superconducting Darmstadt Linear Accelerator S-DALINAC it is possible to accelerate electron beams to a maximum energy of up to 130 MeV. In the S-DALINAC Polarized Injector SPIN polarized electrons with a polarization of up to 86% can be produced. The polarization can be measured with two already mounted Mott polarimeters in the injector beamline where the electrons can have energies of up to 10 MeV. To allow polarization measurements behind the main accelerator a Moeller polarimeter suitable for energies between 50 MeV and 130 MeV is currently being developed. The rather low and variable beam energies result in a big and also variable scattering angle distribution. Combined with strict spatial boundary conditions at the designated mounting area necessitate a very compact set-up for the polarimeter. In addition to an overview over the planned polarimeter we will present drafts of the target chamber, the beam separation chamber including a angle-defining aperture and the separation dipole as well as the beamline to the detectors and the beam dump.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-TUPG42  
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TUPG43 The Next Generation of Cryogenic Current Comparators for Beam Monitoring 441
 
  • V. Tympel, J. Golm, R. Neubert, P. Seidel
    FSU Jena, Jena, Germany
  • J. Golm, T. Stöhlker
    HIJ, Jena, Germany
  • F. Kurian, M. Schwickert, T. Sieber, T. Stöhlker
    GSI, Darmstadt, Germany
  • M. Schmelz, R. Stolz
    IPHT, Jena, Germany
  • T. Stöhlker
    IOQ, Jena, Germany
  • V. Zakosarenko
    Supracon AG, Jena, Germany
 
  Funding: Federal Ministry of Education and Research- BMBF, contract: 05P15SJRBA
A new Cryogenic Current Comparator with eXtended Dimensions (CCC-XD) is currently under development for a non-destructive, highly sensitive monitoring of nA-intensities of beams for larger beamline diameters planned for the new FAIR accelerator facility at GSI. The CCC consists of a superconducting coil which is read out by a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID), a flux concentrator and a superconducting shield. The new flux concentrator comprises of a specially designed, highly permeable core made of nanocrystalline material in order to assure a low-noise operation and a high system bandwidth of up to 200 kHz. The superconducting shielding of niobium has extended geometric dimensions and will suppress disturbing magnetic fields of the beamline environment effectively. New SQUID sensors with sub-μm-Josephson junctions enable extreme low-noise signals and high disturbance-suppression. The CCC-XD system and the new dedicated cryostat will be ready for testing in the CRYRING at GSI in 2017. Results from electrical measurements with the components of the new CCC-XD Setup will be presented in this work.
 
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DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-TUPG43  
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TUPG44 Diagnoses and Controls of Single e-Pulse Extraction at LCLS-I for the ESTB Program 445
 
  • J.C. Sheppard, T.G. Beukers, W.S. Colocho, F.-J. Decker, A.A. Lutman, B.D. McKee, T.J. Smith, M.K. Sullivan
    SLAC, Menlo Park, California, USA
 
  A pulsed magnet is used to kick single electron bunches into the SLAC A-line from the 120 Hz LCLS-1 bunch train. These single bunches are transported to the End Station Test Beam facility. It is mandated that extraction from the LCLS beam does not disturb the non-kicked pulses. An 8 mrad kick is required to extract a bunch; without compensation the following bunch experiences a 2 urad kick; with compensation this kick is reduced to about 0.1 urad which is well within the jitter level of about 0.3 urad. Electron and photon diagnostics were used to identify problems arising from eddy currents, beam feedback errors, and inadequate monitoring and control protocol. This paper discusses the efforts to diagnose, remedy, and control the pulse snatching.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-TUPG44  
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TUPG50 Status of Beam Current Transformer Developments for FAIR 461
 
  • M. Schwickert, F. Kurian, H. Reeg, T. Sieber
    GSI, Darmstadt, Germany
  • K. Hofmann
    TU Darmstadt, Darmstadt, Germany
  • F. Kurian
    HIJ, Jena, Germany
  • R. Neubert, P. Seidel
    FSU Jena, Jena, Germany
  • E. Soliman
    German University in Cairo, New Cairo City, Egypt
 
  In view of the upcoming FAIR project (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) several long-term development projects had been initiated with regard to diagnostic devices for beam current measurement. The main accelerator of FAIR will be the fast ramped superconducting synchrotron SIS100. Design parameters of SIS100 are acceleration of 2.5·1013 protons/cycle to 29 GeV for the production of antiprotons, as well as acceleration and slow extraction of p to U ions at 109 ions/s in the energy range of 0.4-2.7 GeV/u and extraction times of up to 10 s. For high-intensity operation non-intercepting devices are mandatory, thus the developments presented in this contribution focus on purpose-built beam current transformers. First prototype measurements of a dc current transformer based on a Tunneling Magneto Resistance sensor are presented, as well as recent achievements with a SQUID-based Cryogenic Current Comparator.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-TUPG50  
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TUPG51 Micro Pattern Ionization Chamber with Adaptive Amplifiers as Dose Delivery Monitor for Therapeutic Proton LINAC 464
 
  • E. Cisbani, A. Carloni, S. Colilli, G. De Angelis, S. Frullani, F. Ghio, F. Giuliani, M. Gricia, M. Lucentini, C. Notaro, F. Santavenere, A. Spurio, G. Vacca
    ISS, Rome, Italy
  • A. Ampollini, P. Nenzi, L. Picardi, C. Ronsivalle, M. Vadrucci
    ENEA C.R. Frascati, Frascati (Roma), Italy
  • E. Basile
    Azienda Ospedaliera Papardo, Messina, Italy
  • D.M. Castelluccio
    ENEA-Bologna, Bologna, Italy
  • C. Placido
    University of Rome "La Sapienza", Rome, Italy
 
  Funding: Regione Lazio: TOP-IMPLART project
A dedicated dose delivery monitor is under development for the TOP-IMPLART proton accelerator, the first LINAC for cancer therapy. It is expected to measure the intensity profile to precisely monitor the fully active 3+1D (x/y/z and intensity) dose delivery of each short pulses (few micro-s, 0.1-10 micro-A pulse current at ~100 Hz) of the therapeutic proton beam (up to 230 MeV). The monitor system consists of planar gas chambers operating in ionization regime with cathode plane made ofμpattern pads alternately connected by orthogonal strips*. The dedicated readout electronics features trans-impedance amplifier that dynamically adapts its integrating feedback capacitance to the incoming amount of charge, then opportunistically changing its gain. The measured absolute sensitivity is about 100 fC (better than 0.03 relative sensitivity), the dynamic range up to 10000 (2 gain settings) with time response at the level of few ns, and virtually no dead time. Small scale chamber prototype (0.875 mm pitch pads) and readout electronics have been tested and characterized under both electron (5 MeV) and proton (up to 27 MeV) beams.
* The pad-like design has been adopted to maximize the field uniformity, to reduce the chamber thickness and to obtain both x/y coordinates on a single chamber.
 
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DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-TUPG51  
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WEAL02 The Wall Current Transformer - a New Sensor for Precise Bunch-by-Bunch Intensity Measurements in the LHC 568
 
  • M. Krupa, M. Gąsior
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  The Wall Current Transformer (WCT) is a new bunch-by-bunch intensity monitor developed by the CERN Beam Instrumentation Group to overcome the performance issues of commercial Fast Beam Current Transformers (FBCT) observed during Run 1 of the LHC. In the WCT the large magnetic cores commonly used in FBCTs are replaced with small RF transformers distributed around the beam pipe. Rather than directly measuring the beam current, the WCT measures the image current induced by the beam on the walls of the vacuum chamber. The image current is forced to flow through a number of screws which form the single-turn primary windings of the RF transformers. The signals of the secondary windings are combined and the resulting pulse is filtered, amplified and sent to the acquisition system. This paper presents the principle of operation of the WCT and its performance based on laboratory and beam measurements.  
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DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-WEAL02  
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WEAL03 Diagnostic Data Acquisition Strategies at FRIB 572
 
  • S. Cogan, S.M. Lidia, R.C. Webber
    FRIB, East Lansing, USA
 
  Funding: This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science under Cooperative Agreement DE-SC0000661, the State of Michigan and Michigan State University.
Strategies for data acquisition and processing will be discussed in the context of the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). Design decisions include selecting and designing electronics hardware, data acquisition cards, firmware design, and how to integrate with EPICS control system. With over 300 diagnostic devices and 16 unique types of devices, timing for synchronous data acquisition is important. Strategies to accelerate development as well as reduce maintenance requirements will be dis-cussed, including using common hardware and firmware whenever possible, and defining a common data report-ing structure for use by most devices. MicroTCA.4 plat-form is used to integrate data acquisition cards, distribute timing information, and machine protection signals.
 
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DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-WEAL03  
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WEPG33 The Measurement and Controlling System of Beam Current for Weak Current Accelerator 697
 
  • J.H. Yue, Y. Li, Z.J. Ma, Y. Xie, L. Yu
    IHEP, Beijing, People's Republic of China
 
  For some detectors' calibration, a very weak electron current provided by accelerator is necessary. In order to control the beam current to the detector, 8 movable slits in which the position resolution of the stoppers is better than 5μm are installed along the accelerator. For the weak current measurement, 9 movable current monitors based on scintillator are installed along the beam line. These monitors can measure the very weak current, even to several electrons. The monitors can be pulled away the beam axis when the electron beam goes to the downstream.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-WEPG33  
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WEPG34 Heavy Ion Beam Flux and In-situ Energy Measurements at High LET 700
 
  • S. Mitrofanov, I.V. Kalagin, V.A. Skuratov, Yu.G. Teterev
    JINR, Dubna, Moscow Region, Russia
  • V.S. Anashin
    United Rocket and Space Corporation, Institute of Space Device Engineering, Moscow, Russia
 
  The Russian Space Agency with the TL ISDE involvement has been utilizing ion beams from oxygen up to bismuth delivered from cyclotrons of the FLNR JINR accelerator complex for the SEE testing during last seven years. The detailed overview of the diagnostic set-up features used for low intensity ion beam parameters evaluation and control during the corresponding experiments is presented. Special attention is paid to measurements of ion flux and energy at high LET levels and evaluation of ion beam uniformity over large (200x200 mm) irradiating areas. The online non-invasive (in-situ) time of flight technique designed for low intensity ion beam energy measurements based on scintillation detectors is considered in details. The system has been successfully commissioned and is used routinely in the SEE testing experiments.  
poster icon Poster WEPG34 [7.361 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-WEPG34  
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WEPG35 Design of an Electron Cloud Detector in a Quadrupole Magnet at CesrTA 704
 
  • J.P. Sikora, S.T. Barrett, M.G. Billing, J.A. Crittenden, K.A. Jones, Y. Li, T.I. O'Connell
    Cornell University (CLASSE), Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, New York, USA
 
  Funding: This work is supported by the US National Science Foundation PHY-0734867, PHY-1002467 and the US Department of Energy DE-FC02-08ER41538, DE-SC0006505.
We have designed a detector that measures the electron cloud density in a quadrupole magnet using two independent techniques. Stripline electrodes collect electrons that would otherwise impact the beam-pipe surface. The striplines are placed behind an array of small holes in the beam-pipe wall in order to shield them from the beam-induced electromagnetic pulse. There are three striplines placed near one of the pole tips so that they cover a roughly 0.43 radian azimuth. The beam-pipe chamber has also been designed so that microwave measurements of the electron cloud density can be performed. Beam position monitor buttons have been included for excitation and reception of microwaves and the chamber has been designed so that the resonant microwaves are confined to be within the 56 cm length of the quadrupole field. This paper provides some details of the design including CST Microwave Studio time domain simulation of the stripline detectors and eigenmode simulation of the resonant chamber. The detector is installed in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring and is part of the test accelerator program for the study of electron cloud using electron and positron beams from 2 to 5 GeV.
 
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DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-WEPG35  
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WEPG37 Nondestructive High-Accuracy Charge Measurement of the Pulses of a 27 MeV Electron Beam from a Linear Accelerator 708
 
  • A. Schüller, J. Illemann, R.-P. Kapsch, C. Makowski, F. Renner
    PTB, Braunschweig, Germany
 
  This work presents a description of measuring devices and procedures in order to enable the nondestructive (non-intercepting) absolute measurement of the charge of individual beam pulses (macro-pulses) from an electron linear accelerator with high accuracy, i.e. with a measurement uncertainty <0.1%. In particular, we demonstrate the readout and calibration of a Bergoz integrating current transformer which is frequently applied at many different types of accelerators as a beam intensity monitor. The current transformer signal is calibrated against a custom-made compact Faraday cup with a high degree of collection efficiency for electron beams in the energy range of 6 MeV to 50 MeV (99.2 % at 27 MeV), which is well known from measurements and Monte Carlo calculations.  
poster icon Poster WEPG37 [1.513 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-WEPG37  
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WEPG39 Measurement Uncertainty Assessments of the SPIRAL2 ACCT/DCCT 712
 
  • S.L. Leloir, T.A. Andre, C. Jamet, G. Ledu, S. Loret, C. Potier de courcy
    GANIL, Caen, France
 
  Four instrumentation chains with AC and DC Current Transformers (ACCT-DCCT) will equip the lines of SPIRAL2 facility to measure the beam intensity and line transmissions. These measures are essential to tune and supervise the beam, to assure the thermal protection of the accelerator and to control that the intensities and transmissions are below the authorized limits. As such, the uncertainties of measurement chains must be taken into account in the threshold values. The electronic has been designed with high requirements of quality and dependability by following different steps; from prototyping, the qualification through an Analysis of Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) until final fabrication. This paper presents the measurement uncertainty assessments of the ACCT/DCCT chains.  
poster icon Poster WEPG39 [0.551 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-WEPG39  
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WEPG40 Optimization Studies for an Advanced Cryogenic Current Comparator (CCC) System for FAIR 715
 
  • T. Sieber, P. Kowina, M. Schwickert, T. Stöhlker
    GSI, Darmstadt, Germany
  • J. Golm, T. Stöhlker
    HIJ, Jena, Germany
  • F. Kurian, T. Stöhlker
    IOQ, Jena, Germany
  • R. Neubert, V. Tympel
    FSU Jena, Jena, Germany
 
  Funding: The work is supported by BMBF (Contract number: 05P15SJRBA)
After successful tests with the GSI-CCC prototype, measuring beam intensities down to 2nA at a bandwidth of 10 kHz, a new advanced Cryogenic Current Comparator system with extended geometry (CCC-XD) is under development. This system will be installed in the upcoming Cryring facility for further optimization, beam diagnostics and as an additional instrument for physics experiments. After the test phase in Cryring it is foreseen to build four additional CCC units for FAIR, where they will be installed in the HEBT lines and in the Collector Ring (CR). A universal cryostat has been designed to cope with the various boundary conditions at FAIR and at the same time to allow for uncomplicated access to the inner components. To realize this compact cryostat, the size of the superconducting magnetic shielding has to be minimized as well, without affecting its field attenuation properties. Hence detailed FEM simulations were performed to optimize the attenuation factor by variation of geometrical parameters of the shield. The beam tests results with the GSI-CCC prototype, and the developments for FAIR, as well as the results of simulation for magnetic shield optimization will be presented.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-WEPG40  
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WEPG45 Present Status of the Laser Charge Exchange Test Using the 3-MeV Linac in J-PARC 736
 
  • H. Takei, E. Chishiro, K. Hirano, Y. Kondo, S.I. Meigo, A. Miura, T. Morishita, H. Oguri, K. Tsutsumi
    JAEA/J-PARC, Tokai-mura, Japan
 
  The accelerator-driven system (ADS) is discussed as one of the efficient device to transmute long-lived nuclides. For the efficient transmutation of the minor actinide (MA), precise prediction of neutronic performance of ADS is indispensable. The Transmutation Physics Experimental Facility (TEF-P) aimed at obtaining experimental data for the accuracy improvement of neutronics evaluation of MA-loaded ADS. The critical assembly installed in TEF-P operates below 500 watt to prevent the excessive radio activation of assembly. For the separation of low power beam from J-PARC intense proton accelerator, the meticulous low power beam extraction method from high power proton beam is required. The laser charge exchange method (LCE) is originally developed to measure the proton beam profile and can be applied to the beam separation device for TEF-P. The LCE device consists of bright YAG-laser and laser transport system with beam position controllers. We performed the stability tests for laser power and position of exposure by no proton beam condition. The further LCE tests using negative 3-MeV proton linac in J-PARC will be conducted. In this paper, present status of LCE tests is presented.  
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DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-WEPG45  
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WEPG46 KALYPSO: A Mfps Linear Array Detector for Visible to NIR Radiation 740
 
  • L. Rota, B.M. Balzer, M. Caselle, A.-S. Müller, M.J. Nasse, G. Niehues, P. Schönfeldt, M. Weber
    KIT, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany
  • C. Gerth, B. Steffen
    DESY, Hamburg, Germany
  • N. Hiller, A. Mozzanica
    PSI, Villigen PSI, Switzerland
  • D.R. Makowski, A. Mielczarek
    TUL-DMCS, Łódź, Poland
 
  Funding: This work is partially funded by the BMBF contract number: 05K16VKA.
The acquisition rate of commercially available line array detectors is a bottleneck for beam diagnostics at high-repetition rate machines like synchrotron lightsources or FELs with a quasi-continuous or macro-pulse operation. In order to remove this bottleneck we have developed KALYPSO, an ultra-fast linear array detector operating at a frame-rate of up to 2.7 Mfps. The KALYPSO detector mounts InGaAs or Si linear array sensors to measure radiation in the near-infrared or visible spectrum. The FPGA-based read-out card can be connected to an external data acquisition system through a high-performance PCI-Express 3.0 data-link, allowing continuous data taking and real-time data analysis. The detector is fully synchronized with the timing system of the accelerator and other diagnostic instruments. The detector is currently installed at several accelerators: ANKA, the European XFEL and TELBE. We present the detector and the results obtained with Electro-Optical Spectral Decoding (EOSD) setups.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-WEPG46  
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THBL01 SiPMs for Beam Instrumentation. Ideas From High Energy Physics 860
 
  • D. Gascon, D. Ciaglia, G. Fernàndez, R. Graciani, S. Gómez, J. Mauricio, N. Rakotnavalona, A. Sanuy, D. Sánchez
    UB, Barcelona, Spain
 
  Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) enable fast low-level light detection and even photon counting with a semiconductor device. Thanks to a now matured technology, SiPMs can be used in a variety of applications like: Medical imaging, fluorescence detection, range-finding and high-energy physics. We present different possible application of SiPMs for beam instrumentation. First, we discuss timing properties of SiPMs, and how to optimize them for high rate environments enabling photon counting. This requires to understand the dependence of SiPM pulse shape on its configuration (total area, cell size, capacitances, etc) and analyse dedicated front end electronics techniques. Finally, based on the experience of several projects aiming to develop trackers for high energy physics, we present some ideas to develop beam monitoring instrumentation based scintillating fibers coupled to SiPMs, where radiation hardness of scintillating fibers can be an important concern.  
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DOI • reference for this paper ※ DOI:10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2016-THBL01  
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